Robert Frank

398bd100ab1ae90a1a0736c07712ccfeRobert Frank (born Nov 9, 1924) is a Swiss photograher and documentary filmmaker, who immigrated to the U.S. in 1947. He is considered one of the most influential figures in the history of photography.

His monograph “The Americans”, first published in 1958,  is one of the most influential photo books of all-time. It features photographs taken by Robert Frank in the mid-1950s as he traveled across the U.S. on a Guggenheim fellowship. Text for this book was written by the American novelist Jack Kerouac.

In the 1950s, Frank was a regular contributor to Harper’s Bazaar, but later turned his focus from still images to filmmaking.

Perhaps Frank’s best-known film is Cocksucker blues . It chronicled The Rolling Stones
american tour 1972 in support of their album “Exile on Main Street”. The film was embargoed by the band and banned by censors. In 1977, Frank went to court and won the right to exhibit Cocksucker Blues four
times a year, on the condition that the filmmaker himself was present.

I have been frequently accused of deliberately twisting subject matter to my point of view. Above all, I know that life for a photographer cannot be a matter of indifference. Opinion often consists of a kind of criticism. But criticism can come out of love. It is important to see what is invisible to others. Perhaps the look of hope or the look of sadness. Also, it is always the instantaneous reaction to oneself that produces a photograph. – Robert Frank

 

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Gregory Crewdson’s Photography

Gregory Crewdson is an american photographer known for his cinematic and surreal scenes of American homes and neighborhoods.

This interesting video by Reserve Channel shows the process of constructing his extremely detailed photographs, that look like Stephen Spielberg or David Lynch movies put into single frame.

 

Paris, I love you!

It’s been almost two weeks since I finally moved to Paris. A beautiful and inspiring city, full of light and dreams. This is a magical lieu that has always taken a special place in my heart. And now I know why.

I dreamed of living in Paris since I first saw Romeo et Juliette, a musical by Gerard Presgurvic. I was 14 years old, and in love with french musicals.

Now I’m 25, and I live in Paris. I have a list of comédies musicales I want to visit and people I want to meet; I have the opportunity to spend the whole day in a beautiful studio in the heart of a culinary school (oh, those tartes de citron…) and learn from a very talented french photographer Mathilde de l’Ecotais.

I’ve been told that Paris only accepts those who come here and say: bitch, I’m your master! So… the master’s here, bitch! 😉

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The Many Lives of William Klein

William Klein is an American-born French photographer and filmmaker, one of the most influential photographers in the medium’s history. He earned a reputation as an anti-photographer’s photographer and has described his work as “a crash course in what was not to be done in photography.”

William Klein pioneered the telephoto and wide-angle lenses, used high-grain film. His photos were often blurred or out of focus, his negatives were over-exposed. He took fashion out of the studio and into the streets.

William Klein was an artist who set out to re-invent the photographic document.

I came from the outside, the rules of photography didn’t interest me… there were things you could do with a camera that you couldn’t do with any other medium… grain, contrast, blur, cock-eyed framing, eliminating or exaggerating grey tones and so on. I thought it would be good to show what’s possible, to say that this is as valid of a way of using the camera as conventional approaches.William Klein

Photography of Denis Brihat

Denis Brihat was born 16 September 1928 in Paris. He works with both form and color. Denis started taking photographs at the age of 15. In 1948, he went to the Rue de Vaugirard photography school. During 1952-1955, encouraged by Robert Doisneau, he started working with the RAPHO agency.

In 1955-1956 Denis Brihat spent a year in India, producing work that won him the Prix Niepce and an exhibition at the Société Française de Photographie. In 1958, Denis moved to Provence, where he settled at Bonnieux to concentrate on his personal research and on the themes of nature. He looks for the inner beauty in nature and shows it to his audience.

In 1968, Brihat started his experiments in color by using metal toning and etching process of the gelatin surface, techniques he tirelessly pursued and perfected ever since.

Denis Brihat’s works are minimalistic, conrtasting, terse, and meditative at the same time.

In 1970 at the request of his friend the American painter Bernard Pfriem, he creates the photography course at the American School of the Arts at Lacoste (Vaucluse). In 1977 he participates in the creation of a photography study group at the University of Provence-Marseille.

In 1987 Denis Brihat is awarded the Grand Prix Photographie de la Ville de Paris.

Since 1988 he stopped any form of teaching to devote himself entirely to his work.

Denis Brihat is famous for the intensity and sensuality of his works and his world view. His photographs are delicate, beautiful and rich. They show the Nature as a living organism, and create an emotional connection, a bond betweet the natural world and the spectator.

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Photographie humaniste of Robert Doisneau

The best photos, the ones that are remembered, are the ones that have first passed through the person’s mind before being restored by the camera.

Robert Doisneau

Today I ran into an article about humanist photography, a style of  French photography that was popular from 1940s until the late 1960s. The guiding principle for this movement was the central place of the human being in the everyday life.

One of the most celebrated exponents of this branch of art was Robert Doisneau (14 April 1912 – 1 April 1994).

At the age of fifteen he learned engraving and lithography, and started designing labels for drug packaging. Later, became a camera assistant at André Vigneau’s studio in 1931. He sold his first photographic story to Excelsior magazine in 1932. Robert Doisneau worked four years as an industrial advertising photographer for Renault car factory. His first professional street photographs were taken during his travel throughout France in search of picture stories for Rapho photographic agency.

During the WWII Robert Doisneau was both a soldier and photographer in the French army, and from 1940 until the end of the war in 1945 he used his skills to forge passports and identification papers for the French Resistance. He photographed the Occupation and Liberation of Paris.

After the war he returned to freelance work for Life and other leading international magazines.

Robert Doisneau died in April 1994 and left behind 450 000 negatives, each with a deep, passionate story of people, depicted there.

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Le baiser de l’hôtel de ville

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Grayson Lauffenburger photography

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I have taught kindergarten in eastern Europe and lived in a lighthouse on an island in the Arctic Circle. I have fished for (possibly endangered) giant catfish in Thailand and I moonlight as an archaeologist in Tuscany. I got punched in the face by an Italian guy in Scotland once.

Today I would like to share works of one of my favorite photographers Grayson Lauffenburger.

Grayson is German, but spends a lot of time in the US. He travels a lot and always brings amazing photos from his trips. He shoots in different styles: from fashion to travel and event photography. And each photo has its own story. He’s also a master retoucher!

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Beauty of emptiness. Chapter I

Recently we were making a documentary project about a place, that seems like a parallel Universe. It was abandoned by people after a big tragedy, that happened years ago, but still has a great impact on people and nature.

Scary but beautiful in its silent expressiveness. Every road and building there is full of mysteries and untold stories.

Here’s the first part of photos I took there.

Beauty of emptiness. Chapter I.

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Tibet

When you think of some place unexplored, spellbinding and enigmatic, Tibet is probably one of the first places that may come to your mind. This mysterious mountain region with rich history is the unique treasure trove of Eastern culture and traditions. There are more than 2000 temples and monasteries, and almost every manmade object there has a sacred tinge. An indescribable place that can’t be fully depicted, and can only be felt.

An Asheville photographer Taylor Taz Johnson during his trip to Tibet had a rare access to remote monasteries and nunneries, and took some beautiful images of one of the most fascinating places and cultures on Earth.

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